August 16, 2010

Back in the days of authoritarian parenting in the ’50s, obedience and propriety were high values. Digressions from good manners, respect and good behavior were often met with punishment. But then in the ’60s and ’70s, things changed. Parents wanted higher self-esteem for their kids and closer relationships with them. Fear-based, power-coercive relationships went the way of the rod in classrooms.

So it’s no wonder that today’s teens feel much more free to act out than their predecessors ever hoped. And they do. Just ask any parent of a teenager, who will likely complain about rudeness, ill manners, constant criticism and even being yelled at by their teenager. »Read More

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,981176,00.html

By SOPHFRONIA SCOTT GREGORY; Ann Blackman/Mooresville and Bonnie I. Rochman/Atlanta

Summertime, and most American schoolchildren are taking it easy: hitting the beach, going to summer camp or just sitting around the house bored out of their skull. But for kids like Amy Simon, 9, of Mooresville, North Carolina, a new school year is just beginning. Last week Amy was in her air-conditioned fourth-grade science class at Park View Elementary, mixing together polyvinyl and Borax to make red, green and yellow slime. “If you have the whole summer off, you get bored,” she says. Instead of a long summer vacation, Amy now goes to school year-round, with shorter but more frequent break periods. “Just when I get tired of school, it’s time for a break,” says Amy. Her next respite will be a three-week vacation in September, when most kids her age are trudging back to class. »Read More

Thursday, August 5, 2010

Kyle Casey National Autism Conference attendees enjoy a lunch break outside the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel. For conference details, click on the image above.National Autism Conference attendees enjoy a lunch break outside the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel. For conference details, click on the image above.

Staff members and interns from Penn State Outreach are blogging from the National Autism Conference at The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel throughout the week. The conference, which averages about 2,500 participants, features experts in autism, educators, autism advocates, people with autism and their families. In this summary of conference sessions, Erin Rowley, a senior majoring in journalism and history, blogs about issues that college students with Asperger’s Syndrome face, and Kyle Casey, a senior majoring in public relations, blogs about support systems at home and school. Both are interns with Penn State Outreach.

By Erin Rowley

»Read More